Each of us needs a go-to place to escape the house and beat cabin fever yet stay safe during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Washington’s recent Stay Home, Stay Healthy mandate reinforced the value of self-reliance and doing what you can to stay healthy. Making your own yogurt is a step toward satisfying both objectives.

Creeks are everywhere in the city of Walla Walla. Rushing and sparkling in the sun or snow, water is ever-present in many areas of the city.

When most folks are in the depths of REM sleep, one local woman’s eyelids bolt open thinking of the U.S. Postal Service.

The previous months I haven’t wanted to get into it, but many readers have asked me “what phone?”

Every year, after a long winter’s rest, local wineries and their guests look forward to the first weekend of April, when the wineries come alive, ready to show their first releases of the season during Spring Kick-Off Weekend.

Every year, after a long winter’s rest, local wineries and their guests look forward to the first weekend of April, when the wineries come alive, ready to show their first releases of the season during Spring Kick-Off Weekend.

When Drew Macomber lost his job at the Colville Street Patisserie due to COVID-19, there was one thing that kept him sane — his running shoes.

Young wines often present certain challenges, but you can optimize them by doing a few simple things right.

Mike Spring has fielded thousands of 911 calls while scaling the career ladder.

Writing about wine for a living is a rather rare occupation, and it often leads to cocktail party interrogations about — you guessed it! — wine.

So what has long been rumored in the undercurrents of our fair city has come to frightful fruition — I have gone certifiably insane.

Editor's note: Recent flooding in the Walla Walla Valley led to multiple road closures in the region, including some of the roads mentioned in this story. Proceed with caution.

“All aboard!” — It was once a common utterance in the Walla Walla Valley. Now, it is relegated to a quaint bit of nostalgia.

At 8 a.m. on a December morning, an event in the West Complex Visiting Room at the Washington State Penitentiary, was about to put three diverse groups of readers together for a book discussion.

While her daughters, ages three and seven, were playing in the fresh January snow that blanketed the Walla Walla area, Sadie Drury was spending her two-week sabbatical walking hectares of vineyards in the summer heat of South Australia.

During my first visit to the South, I of course ordered a bowl of shrimp and grits. I was sadly disappointed. The grits were a big bowl of blah punctuated by rubbery shrimp.